Archive for the ‘balanced running form’ Tag

Runners: Use your legs as shock absorbers.

Running Tip of the Week: Think of your legs as shock absorbers. As you land, use each body segment to dampen the impact of your body reconnecting with the earth. First the forefoot, then the heel, then the legs, with knees and hips bent and relaxed, all contribute to a ‘soft landing’.

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To improve your running form, first address your everyday posture

Many people come to me and say things like, “I have tight quads,” or shortened hamstrings or a tight piriformis. Then they ask what they should do to correct it. They often expect me to show them a stretch or a compensatory strengthening exercise and are often surprised at my response.

Rather than addressing the isolated muscle, it is important to follow with another question: “Why?” Why is the muscle tight, what is the source of the tightness? People are not generally born with one muscle or muscle group atypically tight, rather, it is likely that the way that they are moving is contributing to the tightness. The true origin often has little or even nothing to do with their running, though it likely affects their runs.

For example, if a person sits most of the day in a slumped posture, their hamstring muscles may become tight. Then, when they go out for their weekend run, the tight hamstrings have an effect on their running form. Further, if they attempt to run with proper form, they may be unable to because of the tight hamstrings.

This is why teaching participants how to balance their postures when they stand, sit, walk, move – even sleep – is a part of every Long May U Run clinic. The body that we run in is the same body we live in when not running. And what we do when we’re not running must affect our runs.

So, the next time you hear someone saying something like, “Running injuries are due to the prevalence of tight iliopsoas muscles,” remember to ask the follow-up question – “Why?” Why do so many people have tight iliopsoas muscles? The answer to the second question leads to the solution that will help your running. Chances are that the source is a daily posture that is out of balance.

Then, learn to balance your posture in your daily activities and to run with balanced running form so that you can enjoy a lifetime of running.

And please continue to stop by the Long May U Run website and Facebook page for continued information on running form and future events.

Balance your form, run for life

Children runningEighty percent of runners are sidelined with pain or injury each year – eighty percent! In an attempt to explain this phenomenal statistic, some have concluded that humans simply are not designed for running, that there is a fundamental flaw in the human design, or that only the exceptional escape injury. Others don assistive devices such as motion control shoes or orthotics, or do compensatory exercises in an effort to hang in there ‘til the next run, race or goal. Continue reading

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